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 01  The Night Time Is The Right Time - Roosevelt Sykes 1937

 02  It Feels So Good - Big Bill Broonzy 1941

 03  Coal and Iceman Blues

                                   - Sonny Boy Williamson I (John Lee) 1941

 04  Chicago Breakdown

                                     -  Major “Big Maceo” Merriweather 1946

 05  I Can’t Be Satisfied - Muddy Waters 1948

 06  Chicago Bound - Jimmy Rogers 1950  

 07  That’s All Right - Jimmy Rogers 1950

 08  Howlin’ Wolf - Muddy Waters 1951

 09  How Many More Years - Howlin’ Wolf  1951 

 10  Dust My Broom - Elmore James 1951

 11  Kansas City Blues - Robert Nighthawk 1951   

 12  Juke - Little Walter & His Delta Cats 1952      

 13  Southbound Train - Big Bill Broonzy 1952   

 14  Act Like You Love Me

                           - Jimmy Rogers & His Rockin’ Four 1953  

 15  Whose Muddy Shoes - Elmore James 1953

 16  Burying Ground - Willie Dixon 1953

 17  I Just Want To Make Love To You - Muddy Waters 1954

 18  Mama Talk To Your Daughter - J.B. Lenoir 1954

 19  Standing At The Crossroads - Elmore James 1954

 20  My Babe - Little Walter 1954

 21  Walking By Myself - Jimmy Rogers 1954

 22  Ain’t That Lovin’ You Baby - Jimmy Reed 1955

 23  Wee Wee Hours - Chuck Berry 1955

 24  Don’t Start Me Talkin’

                           - Sonny Boy Williamson II (Rice Miller) 1955

 25  Free and Easy Mind - Jimmy Nelson 1955

 26  Pretty Thing - Bo Diddley 1955


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                RETROCOOL MEDIA Ltd                                            © Roger Gilbertson 2012                                All rights reserved

Blues artists from the south and the Mississippi region, moved to Chicago during the Great Migration and took country blues to a new style of electric blues. Muddy Waters (McKinley Morganfield) had his first success with the electric blues of ‘I Can’t Be Satisfied’ and was recognised as the father of Chicago blues.

Other notable blues artists from Mississippi, along with Muddy, were Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon and Jimmy Reed.  Willie Dixon was a prolific blues songwriter and contributed greatly to the output of many blues performers as well as his own recordings.

Chicago blues style uses electric and slide guitar, harmonica (harp), bass & drums. Little Walter, Big Walter Horton and the second Sonny Boy Williamson (Rice Miller) were well known harp players. Both Muddy and Elmore James were slide guitar players.


Chicago Blues 30s to 60s (Pt.1)


 27  The Seventh Son - Willie Mabon 1955  

 28  Bad Boy - Eddie Taylor 1955

 29  Got My Mojo Working - Muddy Waters 1956

 30  Who Do You Love? - Bo Diddley 1956

 31  Bright Lights, Big City - Jimmy  Reed 1956

 32  Dimples - John Lee Hooker 1956

 33  I Can’t Quit You Baby - Otis Rush 1956

 34  Smokestack Lightnin’ - Howlin’ Wolf 1956

 35  Before You Accuse Me (Take A Look At Yourself)

                                                                      - Bo Diddley 1957  

 36  Boom Boom (Out Go The Lights) - Little Walter 1957

 37  I Can’t Believe - Jimmy Rogers 1957   

 38  Fattening Frogs For Snakes

                          - Sonny Boy Williamson II (Rice Miller) 1957       

 39  Honest I Do - Jimmy Reed 1957   

 40  Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley 1957  

 41  All Your Love (I Miss Your Loving) - Otis Rush 1958

 42  Try To Quit You Baby - Buddy Guy 1958

 43  Take Out Some Insurance - Jimmy Reed 1959

 44  Rock This House - Jimmy Rogers 1959

 45  Confessin’ The Blues - Chuck Berry 1960

 46  First Time I Met The Blues - Buddy Guy 1960

 47  Big Boss Man - Jimmy Reed 1960

 48  The Story Of Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley 1960

 49  The Sky Is Crying - Elmore James 1960

 50  Spoonful - Howlin’ Wolf 1960

 51  Memphis Slim, USA - Memphis Slim 1961

 52  Shake Your Moneymaker - Elmore James 1961

 53  Shame, Shame, Shame - Jimmy Reed 1964

 54  (I Got) All You Need - Koko Taylor 1966



  

Elmore was responsible for introducing the oft copied opening riff on ‘Dust My Blues’ featured here on ‘Shake Your Moneymaker’.

Bo Diddley and Chuck Berry as recording artists for the Chess label, were both influenced by Chicago blues. On the West Side of Chicago, Buddy Guy, Freddie King, Magic Slim and Luther Allison with a rhythmic section of rhythm guitar, bass guitar and drums with a dominant amplified electric lead guitar.

On a visit to England in the 50s, Muddy stunned the skiffle audiences with his electric blues and was the catalyst for the blues boom which influenced Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies.

Although not directly related to the Chicago style, John Lee Hooker with his boogie influences did sometimes record there.